Visual Design in Action by Ladislav Sutnar

Graphic Design, Resources

Ladislav Sutnar, born in 1897 in Czechoslovakia, is called by some the father of information design, which is a discipline of graphic design.

Following his country occupation by the Nazi in 1939, he emigrated in New York where his contribution to American graphic design brought him an AIGA medal in 1995, almost 20 years after his death.

He was the one adding the parentheses around the American telephone area code numbers when they were first introduced by Bell Telephone Co. and as such, most of his work focused on communicating information by making it clear and accessible to the users.

Without efficient typography, the jet plane pilot cannot read his instrument panel fast enough to survive.

With the same objective…

A designer’s aim is always to intensify comprehension.

While he was the art director of F.W. Dodge’s Sweet’s Catalog Service, he wrote two books together with Knud Lönberg-Holmin on the information flow in industrial catalogs: “Catalog design” (1944) and “Catalog design progress” (1950).

He is though best known for the book “Visual design in action” published in 1961 and considered an iconic book of the mid-century, really informative and still relevant today. It reveals Sutnar’s directions on how to use colours, typography, scale and repetition based on his approach to graphic design:

resolution of the polarities of function versus form, utility versus beauty, and rational versus irrational

And now it can be yours 😉 as Designers & Books started a campaign on Kickstarter for reprinting this wonderful book, which has been successfully funded a week after the launch. Therefore, if you make your pledge of $62 by June 4th, a facsimile edition will arrive at your door this October, yay!

How do you feel about this project? Excited about the opportunity of having your very own “Visual design in action” by Ladislav Sutnar on your bookshelf?

Clever works by Noma Bar

Graphic Design, Inspiration

Born in Israel, Noma Bar is an artist, illustrator and graphic designer that studied graphic design and typography at the Jerusalem Academy of Art & Design. He moved to London in 2001 and he has exhibited worldwide, winning various design awards.

His graphics are very flat and constructed from geometric shapes with bold colours, conveying powerful messages through exquisite simplicity or as he states:

“maximum communication with minimum elements”

Cleverly using the negative space, his work is always thought provoking. You need to look at his graphics more than once because each of them is telling a story usually by hiding an image into another image. He talked about this in December last year at The Culture Show – France 24.

“I’m trying to create a story, I’m taking the viewer from one point and he evolves with my work and people see things, they change their mind, they go back, they discover more, there is a mini-journey, a mini-script.”

Therefore, his work is all about exploration and discovery, enticing to looking closer and searching for clues and meaning.

“I’m trying to find the spark, when something is there and it’s not there”

Very impressive is his project entitled Cut the conflict for which he engaged the social community to contribute with materials from countries living in conflict. These have been gathered by the artist and brought together in works that embody both war and peace, finding with this concept a way to make them live together peacefully.

One other project I am absolutely in love with is Chineasy by ShaoLan where he contributed as illustrator. This is a project meant to teach Chinese characters in a fun and easy way through simple illustrations that Noma Bar created with his brilliant clarity.

He is also the author of two books: Guess Who? The Many Faces of Noma Bar and Negative Space, the first one presenting witty caricatures of celebrities, political figures and cultural personalities and the other the dualism between negative and positive space, a dominant in the artist’s work.

See more of Noma Bar’s work on his Facebook page where he regularly uploads new graphics to feed your mind and soul. And let me know what you think about it, aren’t you wondering how does he do it?! 🙂